pinus albicaulis distribution

Share this product!

Established in 1964, the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species has evolved to become the world’s most comprehensive information source on the global conservation status of animal, fungi and plant species. 2n=24 (Kral 1993 and pers. It is confined to dry, exposed sites at timberline. Locations in Yellowstone National Park, where, due to the extensive fires of 1988, the species occurs as an early seral component of mixed. the sub-alpine species whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), warming temperatures may indirectly result in loss of suitable bioclimatic habitat, reducing its distribution within its historic range. Species distribution models predict that whitebark pine will be extirpated from most of its current range as … Pinus albicaulis, as described in 1863 by Georg Engelmann (1809–1884), is commonly known as whitebark pine, as well as pine à blanche écorce in the French language. Earle, 2009.09.22]. [11990] 2.Arno, Stephen F. 1986. Pinus flexilis. Also see Thompson et al. Pinus albicaulis Engelm. Very large tree in Lamoille Canyon, Nevada [C.J. FIGURE 1 Location of whitebark pine ( Pinus albicaulis) populations ( ) and study site (Δ near 39). For the sub-alpine species whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), warming temperatures may indirectly result in loss of suitable bioclimatic habitat, reducing its distribution within its historic range. Seeds are dispersed mainly by Clark's nutcracker [Nucifraga columbiana (Wilson), family Corvidae]. Distribution The largest part of the limber pine's range is in the Rocky Mountains , from southwest Alberta and southeastern British Columbia south through Colorado … The whitebark pine is an important source of food for many granivorous birds and small mammals, including most importantly the Clark's nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana), the major seed disperser of the pine. It is also called Rocky Mountain white pine. A study in the mid-2000s showed that whitebark pine had declined by 41 percent in the western Cascades due to two primary threats: blister rust and pine beetles. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) Restoration efforts undertaken by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and National Park Service in the northern Rocky Mountains involve harvesting cones from potentially and known resistant whitebark pines, growing seedlings, and outplanting seedlings in suitable sites.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *